OIL
    BANK

CAR TYRES & LUBRICANTS

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SINCE 2006

SHIPYARDS

WORLDTRADEHOUSE GROUP

 

SHIPYARD

SHIPBUILDING

FISHING BOATS

FISHING VESSELS

FISHING BOATS TYPES

 

FRESH WATER BODIES / SALT BODIES

 

MANNED TYPES

UN-MANNED TYPES

 

THE QUALITY OF ANF VESSEL OR BOAT

 

  • QUALITY & STABILITY
  • STRENGTH
  • DURABILITY
  • EQUILIBRE - WATER BALANCE

 

TRAWLERS

MIXED VESSELS

PURSE SEINERS

SARDINE VESSELS

TUNA FISHING VESSELS

FRIDGE / CONSERVE VESSELS

TRANSPORT AND FERRY
TRANSPORT AND FERRY
TRANSPORT AND FERRY
TRANSPORT AND FERRY
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FISHING VESSELS
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FISHING VESSELS

SAILING
CEO PICTURE
SEA

EXISTED OFFERS

FISHING BOAT
FISHING BOAT
FISHING BOAT
FISHING BOAT
FISHING BOAT
FISHING BOAT
FISHING BOAT
FISHING BOAT

FOR FURTHER INFORMATIONS AND REQUIRED SIZES DO NOT HESITATE TO CONTACT US

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BATEAU DE PLAISANT
BATEAU DE PLAISANT
BATEAU DE PLAISANT
BATEAU DE PLAISANT
FISHING VESSELS
A unique innovation among the Austronesian peoples is the development of outriggers and multihulls which enabled them to be the first humans to invent sea-going vessels.
The earliest ships were catamarans, which developed directly from rafts. The second hull later evolved into outriggers, which are small projecting structures mounted to the sides of the boat. The earliest configuration was the single-outrigger boat which later developed into the double-outrigger boat (or trimarans).
Outrigger boats range in size from simple dugout canoes to large plank-built ships traditionally put together with lugs and lashings (nails were not used).
They used Austronesian sails characterized by a second spar at the bottom edge of the sails (unlike in western ship sails), the most notable of which is the crab claw sail (also called "Oceanic lateen") and the tanja sail 
(canted lug sails).
Catamarans and single-outrigger ships are rare in Island Southeast Asia, as they have largely been replaced by double-outrigger ships. Many of the fishing boats in the Philippines and Eastern Indonesia are double-outrigger craft, consisting of a narrow main hull with two attached outriggers.
They are collectively known as bangka (or banca) in the Philippines, and jukung in Indonesia.
They were traditionally fitted with crab claw sails or lug sails, but in modern times are commonly fitted with petrol engines instead. 
However, larger outrigger crafts also exist, like the paraw, lanong, basnigan, and the karakoa of the Philippines, as well as the kora-kora of the Maluku Islands. These were usually served as motherships for deepwater fishing or as merchant or cargo ships.
Catamarans and single-outrigger ships dominate the ship configurations in Oceania, however. Oceanian catamarans typically consists of two canoes, or vakas, joined by a frame, formed of akas.
Catamarans and outrigger ships have also been introduced by Austronesians to other cultures through early trading contacts. Notably, it was introduced early (around 1500 BC) to Sri Lanka and southern India.
It was also introduced to eastern Africa when Austronesians from Southeast Asia colonized Madagascar and the Comoros.
FISHING VESSELS
FISHING VESSELS

A FISHING BOAT CONSTRUCTION PERIOD IS 3 MONTHS

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FISHING VESSELS
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SEA